MENTAL HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH

Help Your Child Manage Traumatic Events

Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, most adults have accepted that we live in a new era of trying times. Tornadoes, hurricanes, and other natural disasters, as well as explosions, and other traumatic events threaten our sense of safety and security, and they occur around the world on any given day. Adults often struggle with the effects of trauma, even though they understand them. But children react differently based on their personality, age, and circumstances.

Children rely on the support of parents and teachers to help them deal with their emotions during and after traumatic events. Parents should decide how much information their children can handle.

ADAA member Aureen Wagner, PhD, Director of The Anxiety Wellness Center in Cary, North Carolina, offers

recommendation for parents.

Speak Up For Kids

Mental health disorders are the most common diseases of childhood.

Of the 74.5 million children in the United States, an estimated 17.1 million have or have had a psychiatric disorder1 — more than the number of children with cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined.2 Half of all psychiatric illness occurs before the age of 14, and 75 percent by the age of 24. 

In spite of the magnitude of the problem, lack of awareness and entrenched stigma keep the majority of these young people from getting help.3 Children and adolescents with psychiatric illness are at risk for academic failure, substance abuse, and a clash with the juvenile justice system — all of which come at a tremendous cost to them, their families, and the community.

Emotional Disturbance

Students with emotional disorders are a very heterogeneous group with a wide range of issues that are unique to each individual. However, there are some key characteristics that are used to define this disability category, mostly relating to issues of personal identity and emotional well-being.

Reducing Mental Health Risk for Kids in Military Families

In addition to children who attend schools on military bases, there are 1 to  1.3 million kids enrolled in public schools whose parents are active-duty military, reserve or veterans, but most principals and teachers aren’t aware if children come from military families.

Through support and information Beacon 12 aids families as they deal with the life altering circumstances of having children with disabilities, special needs or chronic illnesses.

Beacon 12 is a 501(c) 3 corporation. Gifts are tax deductible to the full extent allowable under the law.  

Our EIN/ Tax ID Number is 47-5514249.

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